October 25, 2014, 03:54:58 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News:
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar Gallery Login Register  
Pages: [1] 2 3
  Print  
Author Topic: Particle board flooring??  (Read 8580 times)
BobinIL
Wheel Chocker
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 15


« on: August 12, 2009, 07:57:22 AM »

I am starting to get a feel for the maintenance and up-keep needed for these popup campers.  One thing that really bothers me on my 2000 Coleman Niagra is that all of the subfloor is made of Particle board.  What would it have cost to use treated plywood? another $200.00.   Angry  What really bothers me other than a corner of my storage trunk being rotted under the hot water heater is all of the particle board subfloor is exposed to the road on the under side of the trailer.  So if you tow durig a rain storm it is all going to get wet.  My brother in law suggested that I paint the underside with a good oilbased exterrior paint to help protect the exposed wood from the elements.  What do you think?  Is this a good idea??
Logged
Unstable Tripod
Back-er-in-er
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1988


Seattle, Washington


« Reply #1 on: August 12, 2009, 08:19:08 AM »

I asked the dealer about that when I bought my Fleetwood(Coleman).  He gave me information from Weyerhauser, the company that made the board.  They say that the board is engineered to breathe and should absolutely not be painted, stained or sealed.  They say that doing so will prevent breathing and cause rot.  In other words, this feature is a design element; it is exposed on purpose.
Logged

1998 Explorer Sport and 2007 Fleetwood Yuma

gmhg41
Back-er-in-er
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 2173


WWW
« Reply #2 on: August 12, 2009, 08:52:43 AM »

It's not particle board, it's OSB.

I know a guy who did an experiment with a piece of OSB once. He put it into a bucket of water. After about a month, it was still sound, but there was some kind of fungus growing in the end.

I don't have a problem with OSB flooring (it's probably the same price as plywood), but all the particle board in the other places is kind of lame.
Logged

South Carolina    PopUp Blue Pickup White  
'96 Coleman Niagara; '02 Ford Ranger
hoppy
Back-er-in-er
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1885


Peachtree City, GA


« Reply #3 on: August 12, 2009, 09:06:23 AM »

Particle board is the material that your inside table and cabinets are made out of.
OSB is the material that the bed decking and flooring is made of.
As mentioned prior, do not seal or paint the exposed areas to allow breathing of the OSB material.

 The problem with plywood is that it may delaminate when subjected to water for any length of time, causing buckling of the floor.
Logged

Keep your kinlin' dry

Hoppy  Big Smile 
Hoppette  Blush
2001 Silverado TV   Pickup Grey
2001 Coleman Mesa   PopUp Cyan
Briconz
Chocks-a-lot
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 133


« Reply #4 on: August 12, 2009, 09:22:21 AM »

I agree with gmhg41. I've never seen particle board used, typically it is Oriented strand board or OSB. My experience with osb is:(from construction use) it will never delaminate,warp or buckle like plywood, it stays flat.
Our old pup had osb which rotted out, however it was enclosed on the bottom side, which is why I think it rotted(trapped moisture) osb will expand when it gets wet, this takes alot of constant water/moisture to have that happen much more than some splashing in the rain. Splashing shouldn't affect it as long as it can dry out at some point, if that does concern you I would make mud flaps/splash guards so less floor gets wet, but leave room for air to dry it out if it does get wet.

If you do have particle board, that is a different deal, one I wouldn't wish on anyone. Osb has large flakes of wood like leaves glued together,particle board is like sawdust size pieces glued together(if you didn't know)

as for treated plywood it's not allowed to be left exposed in residential buildings, at least this was true of CCA I don't know about ACQ, which is what is currently available. As far as covering it with sheet flooring like in a pup I think I would rather have OSB

if you have a rotted section that's a bummer, I would make sure you don't have a leak of some sort or a condensation problem. Covering pups is against some manufacturers recommendations because of condensation, Starcraft says you can but to leave the door and vent open slightly to allow it to vent.

Hope this helps.   
Logged

'01 Suburban 2500 4x4 6.0l
'88 Blazer 4x4 5.7l
'08 Jeep Rubicon Unlimited
'83 Jeep CJ-7
'08 Starcraft 34RT
frwright
Handle Cranker
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 42


« Reply #5 on: August 12, 2009, 09:27:40 AM »

I really resent the use of particle board instead of decent plywood - or at the very least the OSB used in the floors and pull-out bunks.  Particle board is considerable heavier, has to have it's edges protected with a covering, and is much more attractive to rodents than plywood.  The couple of hundred extra dollars to use decent plywood in the first place for the furniture instead would be well worth the money in terms of increased life expectancy where it is used.

I have had to replace particle board stove mounts and tables because the particle board cracked or swelled.  The plywood replacements turned out to be much more attractive, and lighter, as well.

just my thoughts
Fred W
Logged
gmhg41
Back-er-in-er
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 2173


WWW
« Reply #6 on: August 12, 2009, 09:41:24 AM »

To me, it's just plain dumb to use particle board in the shower surround. If there's one place that's guaranteed to get water, it's the floor outside of the shower, and the bottom edges of the particle board aren't sealed, so they just soak up any water that gets there.

Logged

South Carolina    PopUp Blue Pickup White  
'96 Coleman Niagara; '02 Ford Ranger
Beacher
Parking Heckler
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 3437


Sunny Southern California - USA


« Reply #7 on: August 12, 2009, 10:20:37 AM »

To me, it's just plain dumb to use particle board in the shower surround. If there's one place that's guaranteed to get water, it's the floor outside of the shower, and the bottom edges of the particle board aren't sealed, so they just soak up any water that gets there.

It's not so much the water that gets there, its the water that's allowed to stay there.

We have always been diligent about immediately picking up spilled water anywhere on floor, as ALL the cabinet bottoms edges are exposed particle board.  We also use a shower mat, (we have a 2004 GTE Niagara), or towel to step onto when getting our of the shower, so that puddles do not form and water does not have a chance to be absorbed by the thirsty particle board.

As for the OSB subfloor swelling in the storage box........  That's the primary reason Coleman/Fleetwood changed the design and now uses a standalone roto-molded front storage box.  The PopUps with a front storage box had a history of the access hatches not sealing properly unless fully locked.  Unless completely sealed, the hatches could allow morning dew, rain, and road water to continually make it's way into areas that should have been dry, causing swelling and possibly wood rot.
« Last Edit: August 12, 2009, 10:27:09 AM by beacher » Logged

2004 Fleetwood/Coleman - GTE Niagara  ... For $ale
2014 Thor - Hurricane 34E
gmhg41
Back-er-in-er
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 2173


WWW
« Reply #8 on: August 12, 2009, 10:31:55 AM »

It's very easy to get water on the countertop adjacent to the shower, either while showering, because the curtain hangs over and water soaks through it, or while cleaning the shower, or while just using liquids on the counter top (filling the coffee maker, for instance).

If water gets onto the countertop, then it can pour through the gap between the countertop and the shower enclosure, where it's impossible to wipe up. From there it travels until it hits an unprotected bit of particle board.

Do you station someone outside the shower to mop up any water that escapes while someone is taking a shower? If not, then if any water gets out and the popup isn't level the water will travel.

I've also had water come in through the cassette door in a heavy rain. More particularly in a rain with heavy wind.

I hooked up the water once, and the hose clamps had come a little loose. All of a sudden the floor was a huge puddle of water. Went out and turned it off right away, but once the water is loose it's hard to get it back.

Oh, and don't forget about condensation from the fridge!

Logged

South Carolina    PopUp Blue Pickup White  
'96 Coleman Niagara; '02 Ford Ranger
BobinIL
Wheel Chocker
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 15


« Reply #9 on: August 12, 2009, 10:44:56 AM »

OK so it's OSB board.   I have used 3/4" treated plywood for a boat dock floor covered with astroturf and it lasted years with no ill effects.  It makes sense to me to use it as a sub-floor on a camper.
Logged
Christine & David
Chocks-a-lot
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 419

Ecru, Mississippi


« Reply #10 on: August 12, 2009, 11:10:42 AM »

OK so it's OSB board. 

Technically it is either OSB or Oriented Strand Board.  OSB board = Oriented Strand Board board  Shocked

I really don't mean to be a smart a** but I couldn't resist.   Big Smile
Logged

Christine, David & Joey Dog

Flagstaff 25DS TravTlr Black & Toyota Tundra
 USA   Mississippi
gmhg41
Back-er-in-er
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 2173


WWW
« Reply #11 on: August 12, 2009, 11:13:09 AM »

You can't cut treated wood indoors (OSHA). This means a popup manufacturer would need to have outdoor fabrication facilities to use treated plywood, which really isn't practical.

Logged

South Carolina    PopUp Blue Pickup White  
'96 Coleman Niagara; '02 Ford Ranger
rabird
Parking Heckler
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 5549


N. Texas


« Reply #12 on: August 12, 2009, 11:25:48 AM »

I thought it was Structurwood® RV Floor Decking, not just any OSB.
« Last Edit: August 12, 2009, 11:26:25 AM by rabird » Logged

kfriceman
Parking Heckler
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 3707

Ferndale, WA


« Reply #13 on: August 12, 2009, 11:48:30 AM »

In my experience even in heavy rains when towing the bottom of the PUP does not get very wet.  Your rotting issue stems form the water heater not the flooring; anyhting with that much prolonged soaking will cause damage.

-Kevin
Logged

2008 Tango 299BHS  2007 GMC Yukon Denali * 2000 Coleman Niagara GTE * 2001 Mercedes ML430

Trip count 2014: 5
Nights Camped: 30
wavery
PUX is my life
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 13085


TrailManor.......TRUE Pop-Up


« Reply #14 on: August 12, 2009, 12:26:14 PM »

Plywood is lighter and even stronger. However, if you think you have problems with the OSB, your problem would be far worse with plywood because the water would travel much farther and the damage would be much more extensive.

The use of marine plywood would be better IMO but cost prohibitive on many levels (procurement, labor, tooling, facilities etc). OSB is much more reliable and if it gets damaged, the damage is localized.
Logged

Wayne, Carolyn & Sccamp 14  grandkids  ...Southern California
--------------
'98 Winnebago Adventurer 33
160W Solar Panels, Dual 6V Batteries

EX PU- '04 Trailmanor 2720SL........ 

3X PU '02 Coleman Tacoma

EX- TV - 2006 Chevy Silverado 1500 (ext cab) 157" WB.
Pages: [1] 2 3
  Print  
 
Jump to:  



Powered by SMF 1.1.8 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines LLC